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Posts Tagged ‘General Stanley McChrystal’

QUICK THOUGHTS ON GENERAL McCHRYSTAL

Posted by Andrew Roman on June 24, 2010

Yesterday, President Barack Obama accepted the resignation of General Stanley McChrystal, commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, for harshly critical remarks made by him and his aides against the President. The comments appear in the latest issue of Rolling Stone magazine.

Although the President claimed he did not take the comments as a personal insult – and praised McChrystal as one of America’s finest soldiers – he said the resignation was in the best interest of national security.

And while the lamestream media is leaking all over itself, trying to contain its enthusiasm over what many are calling an historic display of leadership and strength exuded by Barack Obama, I am personally continuing to comb through Rolling Stone in an attempt to figure out what exactly he was supposed to have said that was bad enough to hasten his resignation.

I’ll grant you, it wasn’t the brightest move in the world for McChrystal to afford a leftist, anti-military, anti-war rag like Rolling Stone magazine access to him and his inner circle, but was resignation really necessary?

Of course, it didn’t take long for the historically proficient members of the press to insert their obligatory references to President Abraham Lincoln and General George McClellan, as well as President Harry Truman and General Douglas MacArthur. Both of those situations were similar to this one only in that it involved a Commander-In-Chief and a General; otherwise, not so much. McClellan was, at best, ineffective and grossly insubordinate. MacArthur spoke openly against the strategy of his Commander-In-Chief in a time of war – an absolute no-no.

McChrystal, on the other hand, was thoroughly compliant.

Many others have written on this matter far more eloquently than I, so I won’t bother going into detailed analysis of this event.

I will, however, say this – and it can hardly be denied: If General McChrystal and his aides had made identical comments with a Republican in the White House, he’d have become the darling of the lamestream media, would have become to go-to guy on every cable talk show, would have probably gotten a gig on MSNBC as the resident “military expert” and would have won the title of “maverick.” He might have even snagged a spot on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine … with hugs and kisses from the editorial staff.

He would have been the “soldier with a conscience,” the “free thinking warrior.”

The entire matter would have been portrayed as clear-cut evidence of incompetence at the top by military experts out in the field.
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BONEHEAD ADMINISTRATION – EXAMPLE 15997

Posted by Andrew Roman on December 6, 2009

Just when you think you’ve had your share of “You can’t make this stuff up” moments from one administration, Obamacrats turn around and top themselves. Considering the dizzying array of bungles and stumbles that Bammy and friends have regaled us with for nearly eleven electrifying months, this one is near the top of the hit parade. The words “competency” and “Obama” have, indeed, been the strangest of bedfellows since the beginning of the Messianic Age, but if this wasn’t about national security – and the lives of those serving in America’s armed forces – this would be pure comedy gold.

Back on October 8th, in a meeting with Obamacrat advisers (via video link from Kabul), General Stanley McChrystal finally got his chance to offer administration officials his reccomendations on what needed to be done in Afghanistan. It wasn’t the official National Security Council meeting with President Obama, mind you – that wasn’t scheduled until the next day – but a kind of “dress rehearsal,” to quote a phrase.

Anne E. Kornblut, Scott Wilson and Karen DeYoung of the Washington Post explain what happened next:

McChrystal began with the policy underlying his approach, established by the White House review hastily compiled in February that led to Obama’s March 27 strategy announcement and the deployment of nearly 22,000 new troops over the spring and summer.

In June, McChrystal noted, he had arrived in Afghanistan and set about fulfilling his assignment. His lean face, hovering on the screen at the end of the table, was replaced by a mission statement on a PowerPoint slide: “Defeat the Taliban. Secure the Population.”

“Is that really what you think your mission is?” one of the participants asked.

On the face of it, it was impossible — the Taliban were part of the fabric of the Pashtun belt of southern Afghanistan, culturally if not ideologically supported by a significant part of the population. “We don’t need to do that,” (Defense Secretary Robert M.) Gates said, according to a participant. “That’s an open-ended, forever commitment.”

But that was precisely his mission, McChrystal responded, and it was enshrined in the Strategic Implementation Plan — the execution orders for the March strategy, written by the NSC staff.

“I wouldn’t say there was quite a ‘whoa’ moment,” a senior defense official said of the reaction around the table. “It was just sort of a recognition that, ‘Duh, that’s what, in effect, the commander understands he’s been told to do.’ Everybody said, ‘He’s right.’ ”

“It was clear that Stan took a very literal interpretation of the intent” of the NSC document, said (National Security Adviser James L.) Jones, who had signed the orders himself. “I’m not sure that in his position I wouldn’t have done the same thing, as a military commander.” But what McChrystal created in his assessment “was obviously something much bigger and more longer-lasting . . . than we had intended.”

So let’s get this straight … the general was given an assignment – “Defeat the Taliban. Secure the Population” – and arrived in Afghanistan in June intent on meeting that goal. It was a mission crafted and assigned by this administration. It was laid out in the March Strategic Implementation Plan. It was authored by the staff of the National Security Council.

But the Obamacrats around the table that day apparently forgot that, or didn’t know, or didn’t care, or figured no one’s memory would stretch all the way back to March.

Stunning idiocy.

It was their mission statement, and yet, one of them actually had to ask the general, “Is that really what you think your mission is?”

Dumb, dumber, Obamacrats.

One of my favorite George Costanza lines, from the Seinfeld program, keeps popping up in my head: “People this stupid shouldn’t be allowed to live.”

And then, to top it all off, Jones somehow seems dumbfounded – even astounded – that a general in the United States military, charged with the task of formulating war plans and leading soldiers in battle, would actually follow the orders he was given, saying,  “Stan took a very literal interpretation of the intent.”

What the hell was he supposed to take?

A vague interpretation of the intent?

A half-assed interpretation of the intent?

A lecture-hall and academia interpretation of the intent?

Do these people not know what the United States military does?

Isn’t James L. Jones a retired Marine Corps four-star general?

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