Roman Around

combating liberalism and other childish notions

THE WORLD ACCORDING TO TOM HANKS

Posted by Andrew Roman on March 10, 2010

Tom Hanks as Forrest Gump

Were you aware that the United States of America was intent on destroying the Japanese people during World War II because they were different? Did you know that America’s motivation in making war on the Japanese Empire in 1941 was rooted in the fact that “they” weren’t the same as “us?” Were you also aware that Americans hated the Japanese because they believed in different gods?

America’s fight with Japan in World War II evidently had nothing to do with the fact the Japanese had launched a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor that killed 2,400 people, or that they were a vicious and brutal empire hell bent on enslaving everyone in its path.

It’s because they were different and believed in different gods.

If these delectable morsels of American history have eluded you – if you are outraged at the con job American textbooks have been perpetrating for lo, these many moons – it may be worth your while to seek out competent, reliable historians to help set the record straight. It may be time to cast off the assembly-line, force-fed interpretations of what the Second World War was really all about and seek out those who will place the events of that tumultuous time in proper context. It’s time for the most steadfast, unfailing historical minds to shed light on the greatest, most wide-spread conflict the world has ever known.

It’s time to bring in Tom Hanks.

Indeed, for those of you looking to draw parallels between history and current events – for those of you trying to make sense of a topsy-turvy world rife with conflict – one need only pick the brain of Forrest Gump himself. What better person to put World War II – along with the conflicts of today – in proper perspective than Tom Hanks? After all, isn’t that why we ask entertainers what they think about world events? Because their insights help us to wrap our brains around complicated happenings we might not otherwise be able to understand? And who is more qualified – and believable – than Tom Hanks?

Thanks to him, using history as a guide, we can now begin to understand the reason why many Americans are so keen on destroying Islamo-fascists: because they’re different.

But what does Tom mean by “different”?

John Nolte at Big Hollywood writes:

…when it comes to leftist Hollywood, whenever Tinseltown and America meet, you have to brace yourself for it — and by “it” I mean the leftist sucker punch. Throughout, Hanks sounds perfectly reasonable, intelligent and even patriotic for a couple of thousand words. But of course that’s just the lure to get us on his side before we’re walloped with this left cross: [emphasis mine]

[Hanks] doesn’t see the series as simply eye-opening history. He hopes it offers Americans a chance to ponder the sacrifices of our current soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan. “From the outset, we wanted to make people wonder how our troops can re-enter society in the first place,” Hanks says. “How could they just pick up their lives and get on with the rest of us? Back in World War II, we viewed the Japanese as ‘yellow, slant-eyed dogs’ that believed in different gods. They were out to kill us because our way of living was different. We, in turn, wanted to annihilate them because they were different. Does that sound familiar, by any chance, to what’s going on today?”

There’s no such thing as a definitive history. But what was once a passing interest for Hanks has become an obsession. He’s a man on a mission to make our back pages come alive, to keep overhauling the history we know and, in the process, get us to understand not just the past but the choices we make today.

No matter how many times you read this passage the context is clear. By “different” Hanks is clearly referring to race, culture and religion, not ideology.

To leftists, all ideologies are equal. To listen to Hanks is to take another ride on the moral equivalency train. One man’s terrorist is another’s freedom fighter, blah, blah, blah.

But a little history lesson is in order.

It was America – rooted in her Judeo-Christian value system – that saw fit to rebuild Japan after the war at tremendous expense. It was the United States that invested manpower and money to transform an axis nation allied with Adolf Hitler into a liberated world economic power.

After the war, the Japanese weren’t enslaved. They didn’t become subjects of America. And while the opportunities to “annihilate” Japan were certainly plentiful – and would have been easy – it didn’t happen.

Those “yellow, slant-eyed dogs” are America’s allies today.

Indeed, the Japanese are still ‘different from us” in many ways. The overwhelming vast majority of Japanese are Buddhists and Shintoists, for example. In the World According to Tom Hanks, I wonder what keeps America from annihilating them today?

One also wonders how similarly “moral” the Japanese would have been to their American subjects had Japan won the war? If their barbaric and inhumane actions all over the Far East prior to Pearl Harbor were any indication, it wouldn’t have been pretty.

Nolte writes:

And to answer Hanks’s question: No — annihilating people who are different sounds NOTHING like what’s going on today.

This country spends billions and billions of dollars on weapons designed to target the enemy and save the lives of people who are “different” — those who are not our enemy but still manage to look different, speak languages we don’t and worship in ways unfamiliar to us. The irony is that as Hanks spoke those slanderous words, the American Military remains in the middle of two conflicts that have cost us thousands of precious lives and hundreds of billions of dollars all towards the noble goal of liberating 50 million “different” people in Iraq and Afghanistan. And we all know that had we practiced a more selfish and barbaric form of war the enemy would’ve been destroyed faster, American lives would’ve been saved, and the financial cost would not have been nearly as high.

But that’s not who we are.

Amen, brother.

Incidentally, in the name of fairness and accuracy, let me avoid the semantics.

The Imperialist Japanese were different than Americans. They slaughtered innocents by the tens of thousands – in China, Korea, Phillipines, etc – and believed themselves to be a master race, not unlike the Nazis. They were virtuosos of torture, and were determined to keep expanding their empire at any and all costs. They also demanded that while their evil empire continued to grow, America keep supplying them with resources like steel and coal.

Islamo-fascists are, too, different from Americans. Their value system is radically different than ours – and they have consistently unleashed their barbarism and brutality on innocents all across the world, murdering tens of thousands, including three thousand here on American soil. They are murderous thugs with no remorse and no intention of stopping until the entire world falls in line.

Different? Yes.

But not in the way Hanks means.

Poor Tom Hanks. Stupid is as stupid says.

Advertisements

2 Responses to “THE WORLD ACCORDING TO TOM HANKS”

  1. sasoc said

    Awesome post! I liked the reference to the sick train Hanks and his ilk like to ride, and as I was reading I was hoping to see a clear articulation of the very real differences – moral differences – that existed between Imperial Japan and the USA during WWII and there it was, laid out beautifully at the end of your essay (powerful finish!). I would add the simple fact that in 1945 only the USA possessed nuclear weapons and a massive and mostly unharmed war machine and we could have created a true world imperial empire. But we didn’t. That makes us morally superior to any nation the world has ever known.
    Kudos to you, I’ll be back for more. Harvey
    sasoc.wordpress

  2. Just read an article at the frumforum that The Pacific, Tom Hank’s newest undertaking, can be a delight to novice historians. Although, history based dramas have their place, I feel they can also be deceptive, even if unintentionally. For example, after watching the Ten Commandments, Moses, in my mind, now looks like Heston and even has a few of his mannerisms. Is not that something of a distortion of history? We must always remember that the aim of these motion pictures is entertainment and really not education.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: