Roman Around

combating liberalism and other childish notions

TERRORIST LAWYER: I CAN’T SAY IF 9/11 WAS MURDER

Posted by Andrew Roman on November 24, 2009

Kudos to Attorney General Eric Holder – and of course, the man really calling all the shots, President Barack Obama – for bringing the mastermind of the September 11th attacks (and four of his cohorts) to New York City to face a civilian jury of his non-peers. Congratulations to the walking unconscious who constitute America’s gurgling leftocracy for furnishing a forum from where the 9/11 five will spend the next who-knows-how-many-years spitting out their anti-American propaganda. And an extra special tip of the hat to Scott Fenstermaker, attorney for Ali Abd al-Aziz Ali (one of the 9/11 five), who appeared on Fox News Channel’s The O’Reilly Factor last evening to prove to the prying eyes of the world that American justice is, indeed, blind, and that even terrorists can be innocent until proven guilty.

It was remarkable exchange.

Fenstermaker, for instance, was unwilling to say that the nearly three thousand people killed on September 11, 2001 were actually murdered.

Can't say that it's murderO’Reilly: Now, if the anti-American stuff dominates the trial, which it has to on your side – the defense – don’t you think the 9/11 families are going to suffer hearing this kind of garbage?

Fenstermaker: Well, I don’t necessarily think the defense is going to be anti-American. I think it’s basically going to be a justification defense.

O’Reilly: A justification for murdering three thousand civilians? That’s a pretty tough nut.

Fenstermaker: Well, I think the jury decides whether they’ve murdered three thousand. First of all, I don’t think it’s three thousand people. I think it’s less than that. However many it is, I think the jury decides that.

O’Reilly: Do you think there’s any justification on earth to kill thousands of civilians who go to work in the morning? Is there anything to justify that?

Fenstermaker: I’m not the person who is going to be making that decision.

O’Reilly: You’re the lawyer. I mean, you’re going to be asked that question. Surely, you’re going to be prepared to answer it.

Fenstermaker: As I explained before, I’m actually not going to be representing my client –

O’Reilly: But you’re working on the team.

Fenstermaker: That’s right.

O’Reilly: I’ll ask it again. Is there any justification on this earth to murder thousands of innocent people?

Fenstermaker: Well, as I said, the trial is to determine whether they were murdered or not. And a jury’s going to decide that.

O’Reilly: Are you sitting here as a human being telling me the people on 9/11 weren’t murdered?

Fenstermaker: I’m telling you the jury’s going to decide that.

O’Reilly: I want to know what you think.

Fenstermaker: I’m not going to be a juror in that case.

O’Reilly: So, you’re not going to say one way or another whether you feel those people were murdered?

Fenstermaker: I’m not a juror. The jurors decide.

And for those who may have held even the slightest inkling of hope that the trial would not descend into an anti-American, propoganda-filled farce, I extend my deepest regrets:

O’Reilly: In the courtroom, we are going to hear Al-Qaeda propaganda, correct?

Fenstermaker: I wouldn’t say that’s the case. I’d say you’re going to hear a lot of propaganda. I wouldn’t necessarily say –

O’Reilly: Well, if they’re Al-Qaeda, what kind of propaganda? Are we going to hear Roman Catholic propaganda?

Fenstermaker: We’re going to hear a lot of United States government propaganda.

O’Reilly: So, the strategy is to attack the United States government foreign policy and the way they operate?

Fenstermaker: I wouldn’t say that. All I’m saying is you’re going to hear a lot of United States government propaganda.

O’Reilly: But I don’t understand what that means. If you’re on the team, and you’re shaping your defense, what are we going to hear? That the United States is bad?

Fenstermaker: Bad? I don’t know what bad means.

O’Reilly: You don’t know what bad means? We’re getting into Bill Clinton territory. We don’t know what “is” means.

Fenstermaker: Okay.

O’Reilly: You’re okay with that?

Fenstermaker: What I’m okay with is that I think they’re going to put on their defense. The jurors are going to decide –

O’Reilly: You’re part of the defense.

Fenstermaker: As I’ve explained, I’m not going to be part of the defense at the trial.

O’Reilly: I don’t care about that. You’re shaping the defense. You just got back from Guanatanamo. You know these guys –

Fenstermaker: I know one of them.

O’Reilly: All right, you know one of them. Re we going to hear that they’re justified in killing three-thousand American civilians because the country – the USA – is a vile country? Are we going to hear that?

Fenstermaker: I think that the number of people was actually less than three-thousand.

Fenstermaker went on to say that he was not only honored to be part of the defense team, but that he would be quite satisfied to see the 9/11 five walk away scot-free, as long as the trial was a fair one.

After O’Reilly asked him whether or not he cared that people hated him for being part of the terrorist’s defense team, Fenstermaker replied, “I’m honored that they hate me … I’m honored because the people who hate me hate the rule of law.”

Another round of applause for the Bammy Bunch is in order.

Without them, this “The Constitution is For Everyone” bag-o-fun would not be possible.

And just think, this is only the beginning.

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